Tag Archives: Exercise

5K in Portsmouth To Support Children’s Museum Virginia

The Bunny Hop 5K & 1 Mile Family Fun Run is coming up this Saturday, March 25, 2017. The event will take place in Portsmouth, Va., with registration opening at 7 a.m. at the Portsmouth Pavilion.

This will be the 3rd year for the Bunny Hop event, with proceeds going towards the Children’s Museum of Virginia. Most of the earnings go towards maintaining the museum’s exhibits. Stephen Corving, the unofficial race director, and one of five board members that volunteer for the event said “we encourage kids to play with the exhibits, so you can imagine the work to maintain them.”

The family fun run begins at 8 a.m., and the 5K begins at 8:30 a.m., followed by fun activities for the children including face painting and balloon animals. Food will be provided by Chick-fil-a, and beer will be available for adults. The events will begin wrapping up at 11 a.m.

Stephen says to save your race bib to get free admission into the museum. The admission is good to be used one time between race day and April 15.

To sign up for the event, click here.

For directions to the Pavilion, click here.

Research Leans Towards Pilates for Improved Athletic Performance

Joseph Pilates started exercising to combat his physical disadvantages, such as asthma, which allowed him to form his own system that we know today as ‘Pilates.’ Since the workout routines boom in recognition in the 1970’s, studies have followed on the effects of Pilates.

Studies show that Pilates improves lower limb muscle strength and trunk flexibility in women, lowers the rate of depression in postpartum women, and improves  hamstring flexibility in football players. Is Pilates the best option, over Barre, for improving athletic performance?

Barre is designed to be a workout for every woman, but not many studies can be found on the effects of a Barre routine.

Mariska Breland of Fuse Pilates in Washington D.C., says Barre doesn’t make you better at sports. “It’s not a complete workout,” says the instructor, “It’s not very functional.”

Jennifer Rockwell of Pilates 4 in Virginia Beach says “equipment Pilates is definitely good for people that are post physical therapy, it is a very rehabilitative type exercise, it is a full body workout, but it is slower paced, it is much more mindful, you’re getting more one on one, so you get lots more corrections, vs. in a Barre class, you can only correct to the general, you can’t spend all your time on one person.”

An article by USA Today in 2003 reported on athletes improving their performance through Pilates, such as quickness, power, flexibility, weight loss, and injury-free seasons.

Barre- An Exercise Routine Designed To Be For Every Woman

What started as a combination of ballet and rehabilitative therapy, variations of Barre have quickly become the new go to work out for women, but unless you live in a populated urban area, you may not have heard of it yet.

Barre workouts have been spreading for the past decade across the United States and Canada. The market is for women who desire a dancer’s physique or in need of a post physical therapy workout. Each type of Barre is a variation of the original, The Lotte Berk Method, and consists of a workout that is slightly different from the others, but the consistent element is using a barre, and simple ballet movements, and creating a workout that does not require experience or a background in dance.

Lotte Berk, a German dancer and fitness pioneer, created the exercise routine in 1959 after sustaining a back injury. One of her students, Lydia Bach, brought the routine to Manhattan in 1971, starting the first Lotte Berk Method studio in the United States. With popularity of the effective routine starting to rise, different types of Barre started to appear, most notably Pure Barre, and Barre3.

Source: Esther Fairfax

A barre used for balance and simple ballet movements during a Barre workout. (Photo by Jillian Knight)

What is the difference between Barre, Barre3, and Pure Barre?

The word barre itself is a ballet term meaning a horizontal handrail that sits at hip height. It is pronounced the same way as the word bar.

“That is to me what Barre class is, it’s group exercise, but incorporating simple ballet type exercises that are modified for the general public so that you don’t have to have any dance experience whatsoever,” says Jennifer Rockwell, owner of Pilates 4 in Virginia Beach.

“I just think because it’s (Barre) result oriented, it’s fun, it also does great things for your butt, it tones, it doesn’t bulk, and it burns calories,” said Jennifer, who has had her studio open for two years now.


When asked who her typical clientele consisted of, Jennifer says, “I think it really, and this would be the California in me, it is for women over 40, who have money to spend, and the time to invest in it.”

Barre is not a cheap investment. Jennifer is the cheapest rate in Virginia Beach at $10.00 a class, but recommends coming three times a week for best results.

Alicia Sokol, studio owner of Barre3 on 14th Street in Washington D.C. says Barre3 uses cork floors, “so the workout can be done bare foot or with socks, there is no tucking involved, it’s easier on your lower back and knees, incorporates small range of motion, as well as large range, and includes more cardio.”

Tucking is a core engaging technique used by Pure Barre.
Source: PureBarreCompany

“Barre3 is really designed for any type of body,” says Alicia, who discovered Barre3 in 2012.

When asked about her goal as an owner, Alicia says “I want everyone to leave confident, feeling strong, and good in their skin.”

An element that sets Barre3 apart is that most studios offer child care services to accommodate busy mothers.

Barre3 uses cork floors instead of carpet, making non-slip socks optional (Photo donated by Alicia Sokol of Barre3 in Washington D.C.)

 

Pure Barre has been the most popular franchise, with over 400 studios. Founded in 2001 by Carrie Dorr, and franchising starting in 2009, Pure Barre is a mixture of ballet, yoga, and Pilates. Pure Barre uses balls, weights, mats, and resistance bands in their workouts

Balls used in Pure Barre routines. (Photo by Jillian Knight)
Light or heavy weights used in Pure Barre routines. (Photo by Jillian Knight)
Mats used for Pure Barre exercises. (Photo by Jillian Knight)
Resistance bands used for Pure Barre routines. (Photo by Jillian Knight)

Pure Barre corporate policies do not allow photos or video of the equipment being used, unless for advertising or marketing purposes.

Deanna Graham, co-owner of Pure Barre in Virginia Beach, attributes the popularity of Barre to being “the simplest, safest, really workout that you can do.” She says it is great for pregnant women, it allows people with injuries to continue working out, it allows people to gain flexibility, and is great for people with athletic injuries like bad backs, or knees. Nancy, a breast cancer survivor, and a Pure Barre client, says the workout allowed her to gain her strength and flexibility back.

Deanna also attributes the success of Pure Barre to lack of judgement in the studios. “It’s a community, it’s a community of like-minded women, we are all here, not necessarily to lose weight or to get skinny, but to get strong.”

Deanna also encourages people to attend three or four times a week, and that people will start to see results after 10 sessions.

Source: PureBarreCompany

So, what caused Barre to rise in popularity? Mariska Breland, founder of Fuse Pilates in Washington D.C. says Physique 57 and Pure Barre are what made Barre explode by adding music. She also says a lot less training is involved for Barre instructors than Pilates or even yoga, so it is easier for studios to open quickly.

“You can get teachers up and running in two weeks,” said Mariska, a certified Pilates instructor.

She also says it is a cheaper investment for studio owners, as opposed to the upwards of $100,000 investment in Pilates equipment.

Mariska, a Pilates instructor since 2002, and a Barre instructor since 2005, says “Pilates is core strengthening, more functional fitness, makes you stronger”, and “Barre makes your body look nice, depending on your body type. Some people find it bulks them, but for thin people, the ‘dancer body’ is more attainable.”

Other Barre franchises exist across the country including The Bar Method, and Physique 57.

Both are modern takes on The Lotte Berk Method. Physique 57 does not franchise, so only 9 studios exist.

Infographic by Jillian Knight at easel.ly

The conclusion on whether Barre is here to stay according to Steph Mignon, a blogger and fitness enthusiast says “Barre has been around in the mainstream for almost ten years now, so I definitely think it’s here to stay. I already think Barre is on par with Pilates or Yoga as a fitness discipline. “

Continue to follow the progression of Barre on Twitter.

Baking Soda, a Helpful Household Item for Runners

Running has always been on the side of the spectrum of affordable exercise. If you have enough money to follow the recommendation of changing out your running shoes every 300-500 miles, then great, your chances of injury, and running in foul smelling shoes are far less. Some runners, however, expand this recommended timeline a little further, which causes their running shoes to not look, or smell very appealing.

There are many ways to get rid of the odor, or mask the odor in your shoes, while they sit in the closet until your next run. One of the easiest, and cheapest, ways to mask the odor is with baking Soda, or sodium bicarbonate.

Baking soda is inexpensive and offers numerous benefits besides deodorizing. It can also be used as a household cleaner.

Sprinkle baking soda into your shoes, and let them sit overnight so the baking soda has time to absorb the odor. Dump any remnants into the trash.

Deodorizing odors from you shoes is just one benefit of using baking soda. You can also keep an open box in your refrigerator for 30 days to limit the odor of food.

 

Another way baking soda can help runners is through ingestion. An article by Runner’s World says it helps with muscle pain and fatigue. The Run and Become shoe retailer posted an article about dissolving half a teaspoon of baking soda in a cup of water to enhance a runner’s endurance and speed.

It is recommended to only use half a teaspoon at a time.
Stir in the baking soda and make sure it is dissolved before ingesting.

For a runner who enjoys the less expensive side of the spectrum, using baking soda to help rid your shoes of odor or your muscles of aches and pains are worth considering.

Women, Wine, and Self Defense Class to Help Women’s Confidence

The 2016 Fall edition report by The American Association of University Women (AAUW),  shows us that in 2015, women working full time were paid 20% less than men. That equates to a woman making 80 cents for every dollar a man makes.

This ongoing issue of gender inequality is one of the reasons Angela Meyer started teaching the Women, Wine, and Self Defense class in Washington D.C.  Angela gathers anywhere between 10-30 women on the first Friday of the month at the 202strong gym in the Farragut West neighborhood of Washington D.C to teach them to be comfortable in their own skin and to be safer.

“My whole life I have worked for women’s rights and have a strong passion towards women and men working together to change current structures,” the 10 plus year yoga veteran said about why she teaches the class.

“We have come such a long way in our world towards women being treated as human beings, not objects, and yet we still have SO far to go.”

“I want to stand with and for women, not as competition, but as a movement to say NO to being treated as objects and YES to being our own heroes.  I am also a huge believer in community, so bringing together Women, Wine and Self Defense seemed like a no brainer,” says Angela who has been doing Krav Maga training for the past six years.

The class is $20.00, and includes wine after the lesson. Do your part to build the movement of strong women by taking the class, or encouraging women you know to sign up for a self-defense course in their area.

Local Instructor Gives Back to the Community with Free Yoga Classes

Local Instructor Gives Back to the Community with Free Yoga Classes from Jillian Knight on Vimeo.

Nya Alemayhu, an experienced yoga instructor in Washington D.C., offers free yoga classes on Sundays at S3 Active, a sportswear store in Union Market. The idea to have free classes came to her after realizing the price of yoga instruction was becoming very expensive.

dsc00341
A dozen students showed up to practice with Nya at S3 Active on Sunday, December 11th, in Washington D.C. Photo by Jillian Knight

Nya has been practicing since 2004. Her instructors had given her the motivation to take the teacher’s training course, and once completed, she knew she wanted to be an instructor.

“It’s the pillar of my life, it’s just a template to be a better person,” she said when discussing what yoga means to her in her life.

Originally at Dock5 when she started the free class journey, Nya said it was supposed to be just a 30-day pilot period, but it’s been over two years.

dsc00335
Nya holds her free class on Sundays at S3 Active, in the Union Market area of 5th street in Washington D.C. Photo by Jillian Knight

The room she holds her class in is often used for whatever pops up in the workout world, such as boot camps or yoga.

When discussing modern practices like hot yoga, or Barre, Nya said she enjoys the slower paced world of classic yoga. “I like things slow, and I like things safe, that doesn’t’ mean I don’t like them challenging, it just means that I don’t have the desire to be in a 100-degree room, sweating and moving so fast that I don’t know what’s happening and I can’t control my breath.”

She says that type of workout actually causes her more stress and defeats the purpose of having a clam practice.

“People that gravitate towards that kind of yoga practice are athletic and see it has a workout instead of a lifestyle.”

dsc00330
Students practice with Nya in a room at S3 Active that is used for various workouts, like yoga or bootcamp classes. Photo by Jillian Knight

“Yoga itself as a lifestyle, as a practice, is good for everyone,” says the experienced teacher when discussing who benefits the most from yoga.

Many students said they simply put “free yoga” into a search engine, and Nya’s class came up, so she is able to serve the community in Washington D.C. by helping them save some money and practice yoga.

Nya can be followed on Facebook or Instagram, and more information on her background and practice can be found on her personal website.

Where is the Barre?

Barre fitness hasn’t been well known for long, but the popularity is quickly growing and spanning across the United States and Canada. It is difficult to trace the actual history of Barre fitness, but most articles written on the subject agree that there are numerous benefits from Barre, including weight loss, strength training, and motivating.

Barre is a combination of yoga, Pilates, and ballet. It is designed to create a dancer’s body with a low impact, high intensity, and fun workout.

Pure Barre has been operating for a decade and has studios across the country. The founder is Carrie Rezabek Dorr, a dancer, choreographer and fitness guru. Her company has grown to more than 375 studios. One of Carrie’s studios is owned by Michelle Garcia Davidson in Washington D.C.  Michelle opened the Pure Barre studio in 2012. Michelle isn’t the only one with a Pure Barre studio in the area. There are two more in the district, 8 in Maryland, and 20 in Virginia.

A counterpart of Pure Barre in the Washington D.C. area is B.Fit Barre. One of the instructors is Katie Oyama, a veteran with over 300 hours of yoga training. You can find Katie’s classes, biography, and other barre-tenders here.

Barre hasn’t interested only fitness gurus, medical professionals like Sara Gottfried, MD have taken an interest in the movement as well. Dr. Gottfried is an expert on women’s health, and gives the workout an A+ for its benefits for women.

There are different variations to Barre. Barre3 at Union Station in Washington D.C. offers a routine that is just slightly different from regular Barre. Some differences are carpet vs. wood flooring, and flexibility vs. stability. Jill Warren, the studio owner of the Barre3 at Union Station, and two other locations, opened the studio in 2011 to focus on her fitness career.

Washington D.C. isn’t the only city with numerous Barre fitness experts. The Open Barre Fitness Studio in Walnut Creek, California, owned by Andrea Holbert, offers a team who are raising the Barre. The Barre Fitness studios in Vancouver, Canada, have the motto of inspiring people to live happier, healthier lives one plie at a time.  Jen Varney, the owner of the Barre Fitness studio in Port Moody, has been teaching professionally for 15 years.

In case you’re brand new to Barre and want a demonstration to help make you comfortable before your first class, Michelle Fondin offers some demonstrations on her Google+ page. Her website also offers answers to beginners’ questions.

Many workout routines start small and then branch out into different markets. Stacy Hinkel has found a new market in Stroller Barre, a Barre workout for new moms.

If you’re looking for a new workout routine, read the positive reviews of Barre, and take a look at what is available in your area.

Take Your Workout Outside to Relieve Stress and Lower Blood Pressure

Almost every exercise picture on Facebook, Tumblr, or Twitter probably shows you someone doing Yoga or some form of exercise outside. Even in colder weather, people enjoy taking their mats to their surrounding environment to reap the benefits of being outside.

Yoga Journal defines yoga as a union. A union meaning the joining of two or more elements. Yoga is the practice of balancing yourself, and aligning your chakras through various poses and meditation, so it seems valid to see so many people going outside to achieve harmony and joining various elements.

dsc00320
A typical backyard offers simple benefits such as fresh air to make your workout more enjoyable. Photograph taken by Jillian Knight

Yelena Moroz Alpert from Yoga Journal wrote an article about the benefits of doing yoga outside. Some of those benefits included replenishing depleted energy, heightened awareness from the natural scenery, and boosting meditation benefits.

Yoga Weekly discusses the benefits of doing yoga in water, such as added resistance and improved flexibility. Besides the peaceful sounds that come from the wind in the trees, or the movement of the water, exercising in the woods offers clean oxygen, and exercising in the water offers heart benefits, such as low blood pressure.

Business Insider published the scientific benefits of being outside. Among the eleven benefits were improved mental health, especially combined with exercise, immune system boost, possible anti-cancer effects, better vision, and reduced inflammation. An interesting benefit was the last one where researchers explained people who lived near green spaces recovered from stress, and were encouraged by physical activity, which therefore reduced the risk of early death.

dsc00322
Local parks such as this one offers the benefit of scenery to relieve stress as you walk your dogs, do yoga under a tree, or jog along the path. Photograph taken by Jillian Knight

Yoga isn’t the only exercise you will see outside in the warmer season. The new fitness fad Barre, is starting to take classes to the outdoors. Barre fitness is a mixture of yoga, ballet, and Pilates, using a stationary barre as a prop to enhance the workout. People are incorporating yoga and Pilates with many outdoors experiences, such as paddle boarding in Maine. It won’t be long until Barre fitness is incorporated into hiking clubs or water aquatics.

For more information on places to exercise outside, visit your local Department of Parks and Recreation’s website. 

For motivation, join a local running club or yoga studio, or use Twitter to follow people like @YogaLoveSpirit, @placestoyoga, or @Purre_Barre.

4th Annual Race for Every Child-Thousands Raise Money for Children’s National

4th Annual Race for Every Child-Thousands Raise Money for Children’s National from Jillian Knight on Vimeo.

WASHINGTON DC- People gathered at Freedom Plaza on Pennsylvania Avenue this past rainy Saturday, for the 4th Annual Race for Every Child 5K. Over 3,000 people participated in the race, resulting in over 1.2 million dollars being raised for Children’s National to provide much needed health care to children.

The percentage of children with insurance is increasing, but there is still a percentage of each state’s population that does not receive coverage. That is why Children’s National Health System continues on their mission; to help children grow up stronger.

“This event really speaks to what we love about Children’s,” said Campbell Smith, along with his wife Grace are the co-chairs for the race this year. Grace and Campbell have a son who was born with a heart defect, and because of Children’s National Health System, he was able to receive treatment.

dsc00175
Dr. Bear at the finish line, waiting for participants to finish at the 4th Annual Race for Every Child 5K event in Washington D.C.

Members from neighboring communities came to the event to show their support for the cause. The first place winner was Sean Laffey from Arlington, VA. Second place went to Scott Anderson of D.C.; whose son came to give him a hug after he finished.

It was an all morning event, with a kid’s dash, and inflated jump houses and obstacle courses for children. Despite the downpours, people enjoyed supporting the cause.

To make a donation to Children’s National, visit their website.

Maine Exercises Children with a Local Pig Scramble

DSC00030
(Photo by: Jillian Knight)

Kids gathered at the Windsor Fair this past Wednesday for one of Maine children’s favorite forms of exercise; the pig scramble . Wednesday night’s gathering of 9-year olds in Windsor, Maine marked the second pig scramble of the 2016 season.

Parents dropped their child’s name into a box, as long as they were nine years of age, before the start of the event. Wednesday night was only for 9-year old children. The evening before was for 8-yr old kids, and Thursday, September 1st, was for 10-yr olds.

Out of all the names entered, only 12 contestants were chosen. The 12 piglet chasers were competing against each other to capture only 10 pigs. The two who did not capture a pig were given t-shirts for their participation. If a winner did not want to keep the piglet they captured, they could sell it back to the fair and receive $35.00.

The 2nd pig scramble of the Windsor Fair 2016 season
The children, whose names were called, stood in line listening to instructions on how to catch a pig for the pig scramble from the announcer this past Wednesday, at the Windsor Fair in Windsor, ME. (Photo by: Jillian Knight)
10 piglets are up for grabs in the Pig Scramble at the Windsor Fair in Windsor, ME on Wednesday, August 31, 2016.
The 10 piglets huddled together on the field before the start of second pig scramble of the season at the Windsor Fair on Wednesday, the 31st of September. (Photo by: Jillian Knight)
12 kids chased 10 pigs to take home or sell back at the Windsor Fair in Windsor, ME.
The twelve children chosen at the second pig scramble of the season didn’t catch a pig without difficulty. Twelve children were chosen to catch ten pigs on Wednesday evening’s pig scramble for 9-year olds in Windsor, ME. (Photo by: Jillian Knight)
A 9-yr old has difficulty at the Windsor Fair's pig scramble.
A 9-yr old contestant is seen trying to get her pig in her sack after she has captured her pig by the leg. Once the sack is tied, she is able to stand off to the side until the rest of the Windsor Fair pig scramble is over. (Photo by: Jillian Knight)
A child captured a pig and can either take it home or sell it back at the Windsor Fair in Windsor, ME.
A winner stands off to the the side with his captured pig. This 9-yr old was one of the 12 participants in this year’s 2016 pig scramble at the Windsor Fair for 9-yr olds. (Photo by: Jillian Knight)

The event took place near the farm animal exhibit, where you could pet or view animals, like alpacas.

The event ended in just ten minutes, but by the end, all of the pigs were caught and the children were dirty and exhausted.

There are three pig scrambles per season. For more information on events visit their website at http://www.windsorfair.com.